Research

Disney’s VertiGo Robotic Car has Uncanny Ability to Drive Up Walls

Disney’s VertiGo Robotic Car has Uncanny Ability to Drive Up Walls

Disney researchers have done remarkable job by engineering a small, four-wheeled robot with the uncanny ability to climb up walls. The robot, VertiGo, has been created in collaboration with researchers from the Disney Research Zurich and the university ETH Zurich. The interesting feature of the robot is that it can climb up and continue moving at a surprisingly brisk pace. Another important feature of the newly developed robot is that it can travel through urban and indoor environments and can move quickly on the walls.

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RIP LS3 Robot, It Won’t Combat with US Marine Corps

RIP to LS3 Robot, It Won’t Combat with US Marine Corps

RIP to the (Legged Squad Support Systems) LS3 robot, more popularly known by its earliest nickname, BigDog. Despite of the hopes that the massive robotic mule developed by Alphabet-owned Boston Dynamics will one day work as a pack mule for US soldiers in the field, it is getting retired because of its noisy behavior. The robot was initially designed to carry cargo for weary soldiers to the field. In 2008, Boston dynamics first made the quadruped robot which was later on updated in 2010 under a $32 million contract from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa).

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Genome Sequencing of Ancient Irish Human Throws Light on Massive Migration from East

Genome Sequencing of Ancient Irish Human Throws Light on Massive Migration from East

On sequencing the genomes of a 5,200-year-old female farmer from the Neolithic period and three 4,000-year-old males from the Bronze Age, scientists believe that the Irish farmer used to have black hair and dark eyes. The DNA analysis of the first genome of Ireland shows link with the Middle Eastern people with the appearance much similar to Southern woman with red-haired Irish lass. Geneticists from Trinity College Dublin and archaeologists from Queen's University Belfast believe the latest discovery of the genome could help shed light on the genesis of Celtic populations.

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LHP is exploring submerged main harbor of ancient Corinth

LHP is exploring submerged main harbor of ancient Corinth

While investigating the underwater ruins of Lechaion, partially submerged harbor town of ancient Corinth, researchers have made some surprising discoveries. Lechaion was among the two bustling ports of Corinth’s ancient city.

For over thousand years from the 6th century BCE to the 6th century CE, the harbor has seen vibrant maritime activity. Packed with cargoes, colonists, and marines, ships and fleets departed for destined ports across the Mediterranean and beyond.

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UC Program Encourages Californian Smokers to Quit Smoking

UC Program Encourages Californian Smokers to Quit Smoking

A program pioneered by a UC Davis doctor is making efforts to involve more and more Californian smokers to quit their habit. Through the program called ‘UC Quits’, it is working to connect with patients across the state.

The program launched in 2013 by Dr. Elisa Tong, a UC Davis associate professor of medicine, through its e-referral program easily enable doctors in any clinical setting to get in touch with patients via their electronic medical records with the Smoker’s Helpline.

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Study: Majority of people who survive opioids overdose continue to be prescribed opioids afterward

Study: Majority of people who survive opioids overdose continue to be prescribed opioids afterward

A latest study has suggested that the overwhelming majority of people after surviving an overdose of prescription opioids keep on getting prescribed opioids afterward, mostly by the same prescriber.

While speaking to Medscape Medical News, lead investigator Marc Larochelle, MD, MPH, from Boston Medical Center, in Massachusetts, said that they have found the degree of continued prescribing both astonishing and concerning.

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Study: Not all hospitals adopt latest guidelines for hospitals for determining brain death

Study: Not all hospitals adopt latest guidelines for hospitals for determining brain death

Published in the journal JAMA Neurology recently, a study led by Yale University neurologist David Greer has suggested that not all hospitals have adopted the latest guidelines for hospitals for determining brain death.

The American Academy of Neurology issued updated guidelines for hospitals for determining brain death in 2010.

Greer and his colleagues surveyed nearly 500 hospitals during the time period of 3 years, and found that most facilities didn’t require the presence of any expertise in neurology or neurosurgery for determining brain death.

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Portable Sonar Glove can Help Detect Obstacles Underwater

Portable Sonar Glove can Help Detect Obstacles Underwater

Japanese Ph. D. candidates have built a portable sonar device with a 3D printer, an Arduino and a few sensors that can sense underwater objects up to two feet away. The newly developed device looks much like plastic glove covering fingers, but is capable enough to detect terrain changes and obstacles in murky water. Big thanks to the sonar technology that has made the device a reality. On being inspired by the dolphin sonar, two scientists from the Tsukuba University have been able to develop the device that allows users to sense for obstacles with their hands.

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Years of Less Rain in California Taking Heavy Toll on State’s Forests: Study

Years of Less Rain in California Taking Heavy Toll on State’s Forests: Study

Researchers, through a recently conducted study, have found that less amount of rainfall in California is causing an irreversible harm to the state’s forests. Previously it has been known that drought in the state has drained lakes and caused landslides.

A team of researchers at Stanford University’s Carnegie Institution for Science in their study concluded that up to 58 million large trees in California have faced loss of water since 2011 due to state’s historic drought.

U.S. Marines not to use Google’s ‘AlphaDogs’ in battlefields

U.S. Marines not to use Google’s ‘AlphaDogs’ in battlefields

The U.S. Marine Corps declared on Tuesday that it would not use Google’s robotic mules called “AlphaDogs” or Legged Squad Support System (LS3) on the battlefield anytime soon because the machines were deemed too noisy to be used in a combat situation.

The AlphaDog robots were designed by tech giant Google’s Boston Dynamics to carry up to 400 pounds and provide crucial support to soldiers in battle fields.

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