Space X Falcon 9 to be put on display though it is could fly again: Musk

Space X Falcon 9 to be put on display though it is could fly again: Musk

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk on Thursday posted a photo of the Falcon 9 rocket that has registered success in landing back on earth after launching a payload of satellites into orbit that was back at its hanger at Cape Canaveral in Florida.

Musk affirmed that the rocket is in good shape and ready to fire all again. He did not find any damage after the landing. The successful landing is considered to be a remarkable feat that could one day lead to the start of an era of reusable rockets and further lead to cost effective flights.

On December 21, the Falcon 9 rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral and sent 11 communication satellites into space before its first-stage booster landed upright and intact near its launch pad. As per experts, the flight was a remarkable technical breakthrough.

Once the rocket’s second stage engines ignited, the booster stage engines detached and executed a series of fuel burns to position itself for a smooth, upright landing near Cape Canaveral, Florida. Musk said that the rocket has suffered any damage, but he said that it is unlikely to be used for another mission and there are chances that it will be put on display.

“Just because it's kind of unique, it's the first one that we've brought back. So I think we'll probably keep this one on the ground, but just confirm through tests that it could fly again”, affirmed Musk.

Most rockets that have carried people or satellites to outer space over the past 58 years have been discarded after their launch.

In a statement provided to TheVerge, SpaceX's reusable Falcon 9 rocket successfully made it back to Earth last month, touching down gently at Cape Canaveral after traveling out of our atmosphere, into space, and back again. Now, SpaceX boss Elon Musk says, the rocket is ready for another mission.

In an Instagram picture, posted a few hours before the new year was set to start on the east coast of the United States, Musk showed the Falcon 9 rocket in its Cape Canaveral hangar. "No damage found," he wrote, noting that the rocket was "ready to fire again." It's not yet clear when a mission that will use the veteran craft will take place, but if SpaceX can regularly re-use rockets on its jaunts into space, then it could potentially save itself a lot of money — Musk says that a Falcon 9 costs $60 million to build, but only $200,000 to fuel.

NBC News report said, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk says the Falcon 9 rocket that successfully landed back on Earth after launching a payload of satellites into orbit is in good shape and "ready to fire again."
Musk on Thursday posted a photo of the rocket back at its hangar at Cape Canaveral in Florida. He said the rocket didn't seem to sustain any damage after its landing — a remarkable feat that could one day usher in an era of reusable rockets and, thereby, much cheaper space flights.

In a statement provided to Mashable, after several unsuccessful attempts to land the first stage of the Falcon 9 rocket on an ocean platform, SpaceX finally nailed the landing on solid ground on Dec. 21.

The landing is important as it allows SpaceX to re-use the rocket's first stage on multiple missions, and thus reduce overall cost of spaceflight. A Falcon 9 rocket costs about $16 million to manufacture. Interestingly, Musk said, during a post-landing press call, that the company likely won't use the Falcon 9 first stage on any new missions, since it's the first rocket the company successfully brought back to Earth, making it "kind of unique."

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