Periodic table’s seventh row completed with man-made four new chemical elements

Periodic table’s seventh row gets complete with man-made four new chemical elements

After complete verification by scientists in Russia, America and Japan, periodic table’s seventh row has been finally completed with the addition of four new elements. Discovery of four super-heavy chemical elements make science textbooks around the world go out of date.

Scientists in Japan, Russia and America have discovered the elements, which are first to be added to the table since 2011. The US-based International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, the global organisation that governs chemical nomenclature, terminology and measurement, have verified the four elements on 30 December.

The organization has announced that the scientists at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California have provided enough evidence to claim the discovery of elements 115, 117 and 118.

The discovery of element 113 has been made by a team of scientists from the Riken Institute in Japan. Leader of the project at Riken, Kosuke Morita, said that now they plan to look at the uncharted territory of element 119 and beyond.

The elements will be officially named by the teams, which have discovered them in the coming months. Element 113 will be the first element to be named in Asia. Professor Jan Reedijk, president of the Inorganic Chemistry Division of IUPAC, was of the view that the chemistry community is quite excited that the periodic table’s seventh row is now complete.

“IUPAC has now initiated the process of formalizing names and symbols for these elements temporarily named as ununtrium, (Uut or element 113), ununpentium (Uup, element 115), ununseptium (Uus, element 117), and ununoctium (Uuo, element 118)”, affirmed Reedijk.

All the four elements are man-made and can be named after a mythological concept, a mineral, a place or country, a property or a scientist. They were discovered by hitting lighter nuclei into each other and tracking the decay of the radioactive super-heavy elements.

TheVerge reported that, discovering superheavy elements has proven difficult because they rapidly decay. But research has revealed slightly longer lifetimes for more recent superheavy elements, raising hopes that scientists may eventually discover the so-called "island of stability" — a group of elements that are both superheavy and stable. Kosuke Morita, who led research on element 113 at Riken, said in a statement that his team will now "look to the uncharted territory of element 119 and beyond."

GulfNews report said, IUPAC announced that a Russian-American team of scientists at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California had produced sufficient evidence to claim the discovery of elements 115, 117 and 118.

The body awarded credit for the discovery of element 113, which had also been claimed by the Russians and Americans, to a team of scientists from the Riken institute in Japan. Kosuke Morita, who was leading the research at Riken, said his team now planned to “look to the unchartered territory of element 119 and beyond”.

According to the TheGuardian, Four new elements have been added to the periodic table, finally completing the table’s seventh row and rendering science textbooks around the world instantly out of date. The elements, discovered by scientists in Japan, Russia and America, are the first to be added to the table since 2011, when elements 114 and 116 were added.

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